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Calendar

The Spring 2017 Calendar is currently being updated. Please check back later to see the updated events.

Note: Any event title listed in red will not count for 9X credit. 

Virtual Workshops (complete remotely):

January

Jan 23: First day of class

February

Feb 1, SSB 103, 11:00am-12:00pm: Mobile Phones and Your Brain: Dr Leynes’s abstract: “During our first Neuroscience Club meeting of the semester, I will describe some findings from my lab’s most recent research project. We began working on a new problem to address a simple question: How do smart phones affect our cognition?  We all recognize that they are wonderful in many ways, but they also capture some of our attention, which can be distracting. We conducted two experiments where we measured brain activity and performance in an effort to quantify how much smart phones demand of our attention. I will present our sobering results. I will also start a conversation about how technology alters cognitive processing and the brain. We hope that you will join our meeting for the research talk and discussion.”

Feb 3, SSB 105, 12:30-1:30pm: How Students Learn: Dr. Leynes will discuss memory and how knowledge is acquired. This is an II workshop and a 9X event.

Feb 14, SSB 105, 12:30-1:30pm: Paul Martinetti will be doing a talk on creativity in the workplace and the use of creative problem solving.  If you have any particular challenges that you’re having trouble solving, you can bring them up during the workshop. Dr. Martinetti will help solve these problems using lateral thinking.

Feb 15, SSB 103, 11:00am-12:00pm: NeuroClub Meetings: Two TCNJ neuroscience faculty members, Dr. Leynes (Psychology) and Dr. Erickson (Biology), have formed this club to cultivate and nurture interest in Neuroscience. We plan to meet every other week to share information about relevant classes, programs, speakers, research, and other neuroscience opportunities.  During most meetings, a moderator will also lead a discussion of an interesting journal article. Communication regarding our meetings (including any readings) will be posted here on this webpage. Any and all students are welcome to attend.  You will get more out of the discussion if you read the article and contribute to the discussion; however, you should feel free to attend and listen. For more information, please visit: http://www.tcnj.edu/~leynes/neuroclub.html

Feb 15, Library Auditorium, 1:00-2:00pm: The Criminology Department will be sponsoring a talk by Marc Mauer, Executive Director of The Sentencing Project in Washington, D.C., entitled “The Changing Environment for Criminal Justice Reform.” Erin Haughee will be signing 09X forms.

Feb 15, Ed 115, 6:00pm: The history honor society, Phi Alpha Theta, will be hosting a pre-law seminar open to any students interested in hearing from young professionals in law careers about their experience in the field. Additionally, we ask that anyone interested in attending the event to fill out their name and department on a pre-registration google doc link here to help us with event attendance. Does not count for 09X credit.

February 22, SSB 103, 12:00-1:00pm: Dr. Dahling will be hosting a resume and CV workshop for students looking to apply to jobs and masters programs. This event will also count for 1 Psi Chi point.

February 24, SSB 105, 12:30-1:30pm: Research-to-Practice Gaps in Identifying and Treating Pediatric Sleep Problems in Early Childhood: Dr. Ariel Williamson’s abstract: “Sleep problems impact up to 20-30% of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Untreated sleep problems are associated with poor child developmental outcomes across multiple domains, including behavioral, social-emotional, neurocognitive, and physical health functioning. In addition, sleep problems tend to co-occur with other child behavioral health disorders. Unfortunately, sleep difficulties are often under-identified and under-treated in outpatient settings, especially among socioeconomically disadvantaged children. This presentation will summarize common medical and behavioral sleep disorders in early childhood, evidence-based treatment approaches, and research-to-practice gaps in identifying and treating pediatric sleep problems. Results from an ongoing study related to sleep and psychosocial functioning among low-income preschoolers seen in urban primary care centers will also be presented. Study findings will be discussed in the context of future research aimed at improving access to evidence-based sleep services for low-income children.”

February 28, Brower Student Center Event Room East, 12:30pm-2:00pm: CANCELED.

March

March 1, SSB 103, 11:00am-12:00pm: NeuroClub Meetings: Two TCNJ neuroscience faculty members, Dr. Leynes (Psychology) and Dr. Erickson (Biology), have formed this club to cultivate and nurture interest in Neuroscience. We plan to meet every other week to share information about relevant classes, programs, speakers, research, and other neuroscience opportunities.  During most meetings, a moderator will also lead a discussion of an interesting journal article. Communication regarding our meetings (including any readings) will be posted here on this webpage. Any and all students are welcome to attend.  You will get more out of the discussion if you read the article and contribute to the discussion; however, you should feel free to attend and listen. For more information, please visit: http://www.tcnj.edu/~leynes/neuroclub.html

March 7, SSB 105, 12:30-1:30pm: Dr. Vivona will be holding a Q&A session on clinical psychology, covering topics such as graduate school, career options, and joys and pains of helping professions. She will be accepting questions regarding the topic ahead of time so as to provide a more meaningful discussion. To submit questions, please visit: https://tcnj.qualtrics.com//SE/?SID=SV_e3V1G1yJyqTKBdb

March 8, SSB 130, 3:00-4:00pm: “What can I do with a psychology major?” A representative from the Career Center will be giving a talk about what you can do with the psychology major. This event is hosted by the Psychology Club.

March 9, SSB 128: 4:00pm-5:00pm: Psi Chi will be hosting a research lab information session with representatives from research labs that are recruiting new members for Fall 2017. Representatives will present information about what their lab studies, what they will be working on in the fall, and be available to answer any student questions. This event counts for 1 Psi Chi point and PSY9x credit — Dr. Stahl will be signing 9X forms.

March 10, SSB 103. 12:30pm-1:30pm: Study Abroad Info Session: Dr. Lee Ann Riccardi from the Center for Global Engagement will be discussing various study abroad opportunities. If you’re interested in studying abroad, this is a great way to get information about the study abroad process. She’ll also answer any questions you have about studying abroad.

March 22, SSB 103, 12:30-1:00pm: Dr. Dahling will be giving an overview of the ‘Common App’, which is a centralized application system that all labs will be using in the future.

March 27, Decker Social Space, 8:30-10:00pm: TCNJ CAPS will be hosting an evening with motivational speaker, wellness advocate, best selling author, and documentary filmmaker, Kevin Hines. He now travels the world sharing his story, in hopes of preventing more suicides, and promoting mental wellness. Kevin shares his steps for ‘living mentally well’. He promotes mental wellness for everyone and discusses how important it is, not just for those diagnosed with a mental illness.

March 28, SSB 105, 12:30-1:30: Writing the Grad School Essay: The Good , the Bad and the Ugly — Dr. Feiring will be sharing some tips and information about writing a graduate school essay.

March 29, SSB 103, 11:00am-12:00pm: NeuroClub Meetings: Two TCNJ neuroscience faculty members, Dr. Leynes (Psychology) and Dr. Erickson (Biology), have formed this club to cultivate and nurture interest in Neuroscience. We plan to meet every other week to share information about relevant classes, programs, speakers, research, and other neuroscience opportunities.  During most meetings, a moderator will also lead a discussion of an interesting journal article. Communication regarding our meetings (including any readings) will be posted here on this webpage. Any and all students are welcome to attend.  You will get more out of the discussion if you read the article and contribute to the discussion; however, you should feel free to attend and listen. For more information, please visit: http://www.tcnj.edu/~leynes/neuroclub.html.

March 31, SSB 105, 12:30-1:30pm: Alumna Emily Lowery-Gionta will be giving a talk titled “The Periaqueductal Gray Area’s Role in Alcohol Use Disorders.” The late stages of Alcohol Use Disorders (AUDs) that correspond with alcohol dependence are associated with highly aversive emotional and physiological symptoms that drive inappropriate behavioral responses, including excessive and compulsive alcohol intake despite significant personal and professional consequences. The Periaqueductal Gray Area (PAG) is a midbrain region that coordinates behavioral, emotional and physiological responses to environmental stimuli, especially those that are aversive. This lecture seeks to help to understand the role of the PAG in coordinating emotional, physiological and behavioral responses associated with the aversive outcomes of alcohol dependence. Using a chemogenetic approach in alcohol dependent and non-dependent animals, Emily explores the contribution of PAG subregions in AUD-related anxiety, somatic withdrawal symptoms, and excessive and compulsive alcohol intake. She will describe the findings of these experiments and their implications for future research.

April

April 3, SSB 225, 3:30-4:30pm:  Dr. Chung, Chair of the Psychology Department Internship Committee, will provide an overview of the internship courses (383, 399, 499), including the application and registration process. She will also discuss recent internship experiences of TCNJ students and discuss recommendations for maximizing student learning and professional development.

April 5, SSB 105, 11:00am-12:00pm: Alumna Monisha Ahluwalia (’14) will be discussing potential career paths in the field of health psychology, with a specific focus on how health psychology can be leveraged in the commercialized world. She earned her Master’s degree in Health Psychology from Kings College in London and she now works in the US as a Health Psychology Specialist at Atlantis Healthcare.

April 6, Education 206, 11:00am-12:00pm: Several psychology students will be presenting on their past internships. Learn about the types of internships that other students have completed in the past, and ask any questions you may have about the internship process. Some internships that will be discussed are shadowing a guidance counselor in the Hamilton School District, conducting mindfulness training in school and corporate settings, and leading groups at New Horizons drug treatment center.

April 6, Business Building Lounge, 12:30pm-1:30pm: Ella Watson-Stryker will be hosting a lecture and Q&A session on her presentation: “Speaking Science to Power: Why Public Health is Political Health.” Ms. Watson-Stryker has been working with MSF in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).  She will be sharing her experiences on navigating the challenging intersection between health and political systems in the DRC, such as the Ministry of Health (MOH) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Dr. Barnack-Tavlaris will be signing 09X forms.

April 6, Library Auditorium, 5:30pm-7:30pm: Social Change After Graduation: this workshop and panel discussion will give participants the opportunity to hear from three TCNJ Alumni who currently work as social activists. More information regarding the event can be found here. In order to attend, you must sign up through the following link: https://tcnj.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0VY2SQJ4mSVdLk9. Dr. Ann Warner Ault, Interim Assistant Dean of HSS, will be signing forms.

April 12, SSB 103, 11:00am-12:00pm: NeuroClub Meetings: Two TCNJ neuroscience faculty members, Dr. Leynes (Psychology) and Dr. Erickson (Biology), have formed this club to cultivate and nurture interest in Neuroscience. We plan to meet every other week to share information about relevant classes, programs, speakers, research, and other neuroscience opportunities.  During most meetings, a moderator will also lead a discussion of an interesting journal article. Communication regarding our meetings (including any readings) will be posted here on this webpage. Any and all students are welcome to attend.  You will get more out of the discussion if you read the article and contribute to the discussion; however, you should feel free to attend and listen. For more information, please visit: http://www.tcnj.edu/~leynes/neuroclub.html

April 17, Library Auditorium, 7:30pm: INK invites you to the next event in TCNJ’s Visiting Writers Series, which will showcase Leslie Jamison, an award-winning essayist and novelist whose work has been featured in such places as Best New American Voices and Harper’s, Oxford American, and The Believer. She’s a columnist for the New York Times Book Review and teaches at Columbia University. The Empathy Exams: Essays, Jamison’s latest, features pieces on personal loss and phantom diseases. It asks us to question how we empathize and care for one another, and feel each other’s pain. She begins the collection with a story about her days as a medical actor, feigning illnesses for students to diagnose.  See her website for more info.

April 18, SSB 130, 3:30pm-4:30pm: Olivia Laura will be giving a talk on examining how using a mnemonic strategy can help older adults overcome age-related deficits in memory. Dr. Bireta will be signing 09X forms.

April 18, SSB 103, 4:00pm-5:00pm: Psi Chi will be hosting a panel of students attending master’s degree programs next year. They will be talking about their personal experiences with the application process as well as be available to answer any questions. Dr. Barnack-Talvaris will be signing 9X credit forms. This event will also count for 1 Psi Chi point.

April 25, SSB 227, 9:00am-10:00am: Ashley Lai will be giving a talk on examining the ways in which school counselors effectively engage children and adolescents of different races and ethnicities, genders, and abilities. Dr. Bireta will be signing 09X forms.

April 25, Bio Commons, 4:15-5:20pm: Dr. Martinetti will be giving a talk on the technological advances in the treatment of alcohol-use disorder. Please note that spots for this event are limited; students should e-mail Dr. Martinetti (martinet@tcnj.edu) ahead of time to reserve a seat.

April 25, SSB 103, 4:00-5:00pm: Psi Chi will be hosting a panel of students attending PhD programs next year. They will be talking about their personal experiences with the application process as well as be available to answer any questions.

April 26, SSB 103, 11:00am-12:00pm: NeuroClub Meetings: Two TCNJ neuroscience faculty members, Dr. Leynes (Psychology) and Dr. Erickson (Biology), have formed this club to cultivate and nurture interest in Neuroscience. We plan to meet every other week to share information about relevant classes, programs, speakers, research, and other neuroscience opportunities.  During most meetings, a moderator will also lead a discussion of an interesting journal article. Communication regarding our meetings (including any readings) will be posted here on this webpage. Any and all students are welcome to attend.  You will get more out of the discussion if you read the article and contribute to the discussion; however, you should feel free to attend and listen. For more information, please visit: http://www.tcnj.edu/~leynes/neuroclub.html

May

May 2, SSB 103, 3:30-4:30pm: Inspired by The King’s Speech, Rebecca Haverlin will be presenting on speech disfluency, or stuttering. This includes the possible causes of a persistent stutter, and the varied interventions speech language pathologists use to help someone who stutters communicate in a more fluid and easy manner. Dr. Bireta will be signing forms.

May 3: Celebration of Student Achievement — You can earn credit by attending paper presentations* at the Celebration of Student Achievement. Each paper presentation is 20 minutes long, and you can earn 1 9X credit for attending 2 paper presentations (for a total of 40 minutes). To earn 2 PSY 9X credits, you must attend all 4 paper presentations (for a total of 80 minutes). Plan on arriving early to get a seat before each talk begins; anyone arriving late and disrupting the talk will not be awarded credit.

NOTE THE CHANGE IN SCHEDULE below: (double check the schedule on the COSA website for most up to date listing)

  1. SSB 227, 12:00-12:20pm — Aditi Mahapatra: “The Intersectionality of Socioeconomic Status and Chronic Illness in Women and its Psychosocial Implications” (changed from earlier version of schedule)
  2. SSB 228, 3:20-3:40pm — Kajal Patel: “The Effects of Word of Mouth on Applicant Intentions”
  3. SSB 228, 3:40-4:00pm — Merrill Levitt: “A Connectionist Model of Followership: Is Gender a Feature of Follower Prototypes?”
  4. SSB 228, 4:00-4:20pm — Katharine Hansel: “Relationships between Religiosity, Spirituality, and Vocational Interests”

*We do not offer 09X credit for attending poster sessions, but we recommend attending to support your fellow students!

May 3, SSB 321, 4:00-5:00pm: Suyeon Lee will discuss the effects of incarceration on inmates’ mental health. The talk will cover the challenges in providing adequate mental health care for U.S. prison populations, and how such shortcomings affect inmates’ cognitive functions. Dr. Bireta will be signing 09X forms.

May 5, SSB 328, 11:00am-12:00pm: *Two students will be presenting their PSY 493 presentations during this time slot* “Diagnosis and Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease”: Nabila Anika will be giving a presentation on Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and associated forms of dementia, which have become one of the harshest medical and socioeconomic burdens affecting today’s society. This presentation examines current treatments for AD and compares the effectiveness of these treatments to potential new treatments, concluding with what the most practical and effective treatment is.

“What drives people to purchase the products they consume day to day?” Megan Vantslot will be giving a presentation about the following topic:  For years, market researchers have struggled to answer this question using methods of conventional techniques (focus groups, surveys, etc.) in their research to discover what marketing campaigns are and are not effective.  Through time, these conventional techniques are being found less and less effective and this presentation breaks down how these market researchers are now turning to neuromarketing better understand consumers purchase behavior.  Neuromarketing is the marriage between psychology and marketing and it aims to provide a lens through which researchers can observe and understand the minds of a consumer.  Neuromarketing shows brain activity of consumers (1) while they’re experiencing a marketing stimulus, (2) when they experience different products different situational contexts, and (3) all of these things can further show consumers’ preferences.

May 5, SSB 328, 12:30pm-1:30pm: *Two students will be presenting their PSY 493 presentations during this time slot* Julia Lester will be giving a presentation entitled, “Can Neural Imaging Be Used to Effectively Change Health Behavior?” Abstract: Mass media messages have been proven to influence health related behavior, but the exact psychological processes that cause certain public health campaigns to be more effective than others is still unknown. An emerging body of research suggests that communication neuroscience can serve as an important tool for gauging the effectiveness of public health interventions. Neural imaging methods, with ERPs and fMRIs in particular, have been found to be an important way to identify the exact psychological processes that cause certain public health messages to effect behavior change.  This presentation will address the use of ERPs and fMRIs in various public health interventions to determine what causes certain public health messages to have more of an influence on health related decision-making than others.

Maria Ciccone will be giving a presentation on the various factors into the failure of fear appeals with cellphone use while driving. Abstract: Using a cell phone while driving has been a problem for years as efforts to reduce this behavior have not been successful.  Event related potential (ERP) and functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) imaging studies indicate that multitasking while driving dramatically effects the way the brain encodes information. As a result, public health campaigns have been established to promote healthy driving habits by using fear. Fear is utilized to threaten a person from using a cellphone while driving by highlighting the dangerous outcomes. Currently there are questions and debates on whether fear is the best option. Therefore my presentation will elaborate on the factors that play into fear and cellphone usage while driving.

May 5: All coursework due for PSY 97 and PSY 99

 

Instructional Intern Workshops

Feb 3, SSB 105: 12:30pm: How Students Learn: Dr. Leynes will discuss memory and how knowledge is acquired. This is an II workshop and a 9X event.

Feb 15, SSB 105, 11:00 am: Research Ethics with Dr. Bireta

March 1, SSB 105, 11:00 am: Prezi vs. PowerPoint with Dr. Dahling

April 19, SSB 128, 10:00am: Instructional Interns’ Experiences: Challenges and Strategies with Dr. Ruddy

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