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Specialized Courses and Senior Experiences in Psychology

See PAWS for other course listings

Spring 2013

PSY 311: Sensation and Perception

Dr. Bireta MR  2:00-3:50

Prerequisites: PSY 121

The basic structure and function of the sensory systems are examined and related to our experience of the world. Topics include anatomy and physiology of sense organs, perception of color, form, movement, space, sound, and illusions, perceptual development, and perceptual motor coordination.

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PSY 338: Sport and Exercise Psychology

Dr. Hall TF 10:00-11:20; TF 12:30-1:50

Prerequisites: PSY 101

The purpose of this course is to understand the psychological components of sport and exercise in order to become a more effective competitor and/or to become more consistent in one’s exercise program. In addition, the course will address the psychosocial aspects (e.g., group cohesion, gender and racial differences, team vs. individual sports) and the health aspects of sport and exercise (e.g., burnout, recuperating from injuries, athletes with asthma or diabetes, etc.). Each student will work with an athlete or an individual who exercises to enhance the mental aspect of their performance.

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PSY 342: Clinical Psychopharmacology

Dr. Ruddy MR 2-3:50

Prerequisite: PSY 212

Explores how psychological disorders are influenced by neurotransmitters, hormones, and neurotrophic factors, and by interventions that increase or decrease these chemicals. Clinical disorders will include: depression, anxiety disorders, anorexia/bulimia nervosa, attention deficits, dementia, and schizophrenia. Both intended effects and side effects of drugs will be studied, as well as individual differences in effects (due to genes/environments).

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PSY 343: Behavior Pharmacology of Drug Use

Mr. Damore MR 4-5:20

Prerequisite: PSY 212

Explores the pharmacological and behavioral events with several drugs of abuse including cocaine, nicotine, alcohol, opiates, hallucinogens, and caffeine, as well as other drugs such as inhalants and Ecstasy.

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PSY 348: Emotion

Dr. Kim-Prieto W 9:00-11:50AM

Prerequisite: PSY 121

This course will introduce students to major theories and topics of the psychology and neuroscience of emotion. Areas explored include the role of the brain and peripheral physiology in emotion, facial expressions, cultural differences, development of emotions, social and cognitive aspects of emotion, and the role of emotion in health and psychopathology.

PSY 350: Psychology of Women

Dr. Brynildsen M 5:30-8:20

Prerequisite: PSY 121

Examines the psychology of women in light of biological, social, and cultural influences. A variety of psychological theories and research findings will be explored to study the development and behavior of women in various social contexts.

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PSY 365: Consumer Behavior

Dr. Becker TF 10:00-11:50; TF 12:00-1:50

Prerequisite: PSY 101 or SOC 101 or MKT 201

Explores basic psychological principles (e.g., learning, memory, per-ception, attitudes, and motivation) as well as sociological and anthropological concepts (e.g., de-mographics, group dynamics, cultural influences) in relation to consumption processes and activities used by marketers and public policy actors to influence consumer behavior. Cross listed with MKT 365.

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PSY 370: Developmental Seminar: Children’s Social Development

Dr. Graham TF 12:30-1:50

Prerequisite: PSY 121 and PSY 220

We will examine child growth and development from conception through adolescence. The general focus of the course is on the “normal” or typical course of child development. Students are presented with opportunities to enhance their knowledge base and critical thinking skills to increase their efficacy in the learning process. Each student is required to apply and create knowledge of how children develop through the use of primary source reading, case analyses, lectures, discussion, active research, and group activities from a variety of theoretical concepts relative to the physical, cognitive, emotional, and/or social/contextual domains of development.

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PSY 373: Counseling and Clinical Seminar: CBT

Dr. Krauss W 9:00-11:50

Prerequisites: PSY 121, and PSY 216 or PSY 217
The seminar will provide students with the opportunity for in-depth study of a specific topic within counseling and clinical psychology. The topic will vary across semesters. Students may repeat the seminar as topics change.

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PSY 373: Counseling and Clinical Seminar: Mindfulness

Dr. Borders W 8:30-11:50

Prerequisites: PSY 121, and PSY 216 or PSY 217

Originating from Eastern spiritual traditions, mindfulness and meditation have long histories of influencing Western psychology. This course will explore what scientific methods have taught us about the effects of mindfulness and meditation on the brain, body, thoughts, emotion, and behavior. Students will also mediate in class and be asked to start a meditation practice of their own out-side of class.

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PSY 374: I/O Psychology Seminar: Ethics

Dr. Kirnan MR 12:30-1:50

Prerequisite: PSY 101 or MGT 201

An examination of ethical situations from a psychologocial perspective. We will start our examination of headline cases but quickly move to everyday ethical challenges that we all have faced or will face in a variety of settings (organziational, educational, professional, personal, community). We will identify the psychological, organizational, and contextual factors that contribute to unethical behav-ior. Additionally, students will gain a new perspective of ethical challenges by learning to view them from various perspectives (other stakeholders, time-frames, etc.)

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PSY 375: Seminar in Social Psychology

Dr. Crawford W 9:00-11:50

Prerequisites: PSY 121 & 1 foundation course

The seminar will provide students opportunities for in-depth study of specific topics within social psychology, thus offering topics of interest to students in the social specialization as well as students from other specializations. The topic will vary across semesters. Students may repeat the seminar as topics change.

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PSY 383: Counseling & Clinical Field Experience

Dr. Vivona W 9:00-11:50AM

Prerequisites: PSY 216, PSY 217

Field experience in a mental health setting, with classroom supervi-sion of the clinical activities. Students in the counseling-clinical specialization will integrate knowledge from various courses as they apply concepts in a clinical setting. Both an appropriate piece of written work and an oral presentation to the class will be required. Faculty approval of each placement is necessary.

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PSY 386 Psychological Testing

Dr. Kirnan MR 10:00-11:20

Prerequisite: PSY 121

An introduction to theoretical, practical, and ethical issues in psychological testing and measurement. Psychometric principles such as reliability, validity, and utility will be examined in the context of selecting the most appropriate assessment instruments to inform decision making. The development and psychometric properties of widely-used intelligence, achievement, personnel, and clinical/personality tests will be discussed.

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Psy 390: Collaborative Research ERP Lab

Dr. Andrew Leynes F 4:00-5:00

Prerequisites: Sophomore status, a minimum GPA of 2.5, and permission of instructor

I am seeking highly motivated, responsible students to work with me on my research. My research lab consists of undergraduate students who conduct experiments that investigate brain function and memory. In essence, we measure brain electrical activity (called ERPs) while people complete various types of memory experiments. Different studies are conducted each semester as part of my ongoing research in this area. In addition to working in the lab, members of my lab team meet each week and discuss our research as well as other interesting research articles. Consider this research opportunity if you are interested in neuroscience (the study of the brain and behavior) and/or graduate school. Students complete the research experience as PSY 390 – Collaborative Learning for course credit. Lab openings are limited each semester.

Do you want more information? Visit our webpage (http://www.tcnj.edu/~leynes/research.html) or speak with me (leynes@tcnj.edu).

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Psy 390: Collaborative Research Alcohol Lab

Dr. Margaret Martinetti F 3:30-5:20

Prerequisites: Sophomore status, a minimum GPA of 2.5, and permission of instructor

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Psy 390: Collaborative Research Emotion Lab

Dr. Chu Kim-Prieto TF 2:00-3:20

Prerequisites: Sophomore status, a minimum GPA of 2.5, and permission of instructor

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Psy 390: Collaborative Research Organizational Misbehavior Lab

Dr. Jason Dahling W 5:30-8:20

Prerequisites: Sophomore status, a minimum GPA of 2.5, and permission of instructor

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Psy 390: Collaborative Research REACH Lab

Dr. He Len Chung TBA

Prerequisites: Sophomore status, a minimum GPA of 2.5, and permission of instructor

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Psy 390: Collaborative Research Memory Lab

Dr. Tamra Bireta TBA

Prerequisites: Sophomore status, a minimum GPA of 2.5, and permission of instructor

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Psy 390: Collaborative Research Attitude and Social Cognition Lab

Dr. Jarret Crawford W 1:00-3:00

Prerequisites: Sophomore status, a minimum GPA of 2.5, and permission of instructor

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Psy 390: Collaborative Research Motivation, Individual differences and Stereotypes in Cognition Lab

Dr. Lisa Grimm W 1:30-3:00

Prerequisites: Sophomore status, a minimum GPA of 2.5, and permission of instructor

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Psy 390: Collaborative Research Clinical Outcomes and Processes

Dr. Ashley Borders W 2:00-3:50

Prerequisites: Sophomore status, a minimum GPA of 2.5, and permission of instructor

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Psy 390: Collaborative Research Social Change and Collective Identity Lab

Dr. Shawn Wiley W 3:00-5:00

Prerequisites: Sophomore status, a minimum GPA of 2.5, and permission of instructor

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Psy 390: Collaborative Research Romantic Relationships Lab

Dr. Candice Feiring W 9:00-11:50

Prerequisites: Sophomore status, a minimum GPA of 2.5, and permission of instructor

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Psy 390: Collaborative Research Infant Lab

Dr. Betsy Ruddy TF 10:00-11:50

Prerequisites: Sophomore status, a minimum GPA of 2.5, and permission of instructor

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PSY 419: History of Psychology

Dr. Cholewiak M 5:30-8:20

Prerequisites: PSY 299

This course will consider how psychology’s goals, methods, and beliefs have evolved throughout its history. As a senior experience, this course will allow students to integrate experiences from various areas of the discipline, to analyze and evaluate psychology’s past and to make recommendations for its future.

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PSY 470: Behavioral Economics

Dr. Ruscio MR 10:00-11:20

Prerequisites: PSY 299

Economics deals with the problem of how to allocate scarce re-sources to their most highly-valued uses, and economic theory usually assumes that people make decisions that maximize their rational self-interest. Psychological research demonstrates that under many circumstances, however, our decisions can be influenced by factors including cognitive limitations and biases. The relatively new field of behavioral economics provides insight into circumstances in which these factors adversely affect real-world decisions. We will discuss principles such as loss aversion, framing effects, mental accounting, the status quo bias, the endowment effect, and the sunk cost fallacy. We will apply these principles to a wide range of issues and analyze the implications of advice that behavioral economists offer to improve decision making. It is easy to see that when people are free to make their own choices, some choices are made badly. What, if anything, should be done about this? Answering this question requires a thoughtful consideration of how the relevant science (e.g., theory and data on cause and effect) helps us to achieve specified goals (e.g., im-proving health, wealth, and well-being) in the context of important values (e.g., liberty, equality).

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PSY 470 Psychology and Media

Dr. Hall TF 2:00-3:20

The goal of the Psychology of the Media course is to understand the psychological components of the media given the media’s criti-cal role in the dispersion of information in our society. Rodman (2008) states that the media does not tell us what to think but it does tell us how to think. We will spend the semester examining how the print media (newspapers, magazines, books) and elec-tronic media (television, internet, radio, music, movies) present various aspects of human behavior and society. For example, what does the media tell us about human behavior? From a social justice perspective, what does the media tell us about social class, age, race, gender, sexual orientation, and disability? From a clinical perspective, how is mental health/mental illness portrayed in the media? Last, given the excitement of the upcoming election, politics is another area of interest worth exploring. The possibilities are endless! We will not be covering children in the media since Dr. Graham offers this course. Our focus will be from college age and above. None of the assignments, including your paper, can focus on children or adolescents. If you want to focus on children and adolescents, take Dr. Graham’s course.

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