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Calendar

Spring 2020

The calendar is constantly updated. Please check regularly. All events on the calendar count for 97 and 99 credit; you can assume that someone will be there to sign your forms (even if a specific name is not listed).  

JANUARY

January 29, 11am-12pm, SSB 130: Neuroscience Club meeting. The club meets to share information about relevant classes, programs, speakers, research, and other neuroscience opportunities. Any and all students are welcome to attend. During most meetings a moderator will lead a discussion of a journal article found on the website linked above; you will get more out of the discussion if you read the article and contribute to the discussion, but you should feel free to attend and listen.

FEBRUARY

February 4, 12:30-1:30pm, SSB 103: TCNJ’s connection to Bryn Mawr’s Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research (GSSWSR) Master of Social Work program. Sheila Gillin, Director of Graduate Admissions, GSSWSR at Bryn Mawr College will discuss the articulation agreement that provides a pathway for TCNJ students majoring in Sociology, Psychology, Public Health, Women’s and Gender Studies, and Bonner Scholars who are interested in a Master of Social Work (MSW) degree to be considered for admission. Students admitted through this program can have up to three courses waived for the MSW degree and are eligible to receive a tuition grant equivalent to 50% of the tuition. Dr. Vivona will sign 9x forms.

February 4, 7:00pm, Kendall Hall: TCNJ’s Black Student Union Presents: An Evening with Political Activist, Philosopher, Academic, and Author, Angela Davis. Dr. Barnack-Tavlaris will sign 9x forms.

February 6, 5:00-6:30pm, Mayo Hall: Toni Morrison Book Club Book Launch. Join Dr. Brown-Glaude, Dr. Jackson, Dr. Kendrix Williams, and Dr. Bennet for their book talk that focuses on their recently published and jointly authored book, “The Toni Morrison Book Club.” Dr. Ada Onyewuenyi will sign 9x forms.

February 11, 12:30-1:30pm, SSB 128: Psychology Brown Bag with Dr. Nuwan Jayawickreme, TCNJ Psychology Visiting Scholar and Associate Professor of Psychology, Program Director, Peace and Justice Studies at Manhattan College, “Post-Trauma Psychopathology in Disaster Survivors: The Role of Context and Culture.”  The mental health problems of survivors of major disasters such as war, hurricanes and major fires are considerable. In this presentation, Visiting Scholar Dr. Nuwan Jayawickreme will discuss how both the immediate social ecological context (e.g., daily problems of living) and culture (i.e., local belief systems and practices) play key roles in the development of psychopathology in war survivors, drawing on his research among survivors of the Sri Lankan civil war (1983 – 2009). Dr. Jarret Crawford will sign 9x forms.

February 11, 12:30-1:30pm, SSB 328: Social Justice Careers and Internships. Lynette Harris from TCNJ’s Career Center will discuss careers and internships related to social justice; she will cover a range of possibilities including working with international humanitarian organizations, social work, victims advocacy, LGBTIQ rights in law or policy work, and more. Ms. Harris will sign 9x forms.

February 12, 3:30-4:30pm, Ed Building 208: Anti Violence Initiatives Presents: Healthy Relationships Workshop. Learn how to develop healthy relationship skills for all types of relationships – romantic, friendships, or professional. To receive 9x credit: Sign the attendance list at the event, and then bring your form to the Anti-Violence Initiatives Office in Forcina Hall, Room 308 by Friday of the same week to get a signature.

February 12, 11am-12pm, SSB 130: Neuroscience Club meeting. The club meets to share information about relevant classes, programs, speakers, research, and other neuroscience opportunities. Any and all students are welcome to attend. During most meetings a moderator will lead a discussion of a journal article found on the website linked above; you will get more out of the discussion if you read the article and contribute to the discussion, but you should feel free to attend and listen.

February 14, 12:30-1:30pm, SSB 103: Learn More about Rutgers Master of Social Work programs! Are you interested in an affordable (and flexible) graduate degree that offers clinical counseling skills, licensure, and hands-on experience leading organizations that make a difference? A Rutgers MSW admissions representative and recent graduate of the program will discuss how students at Rutgers top nationally-ranked School of Social Work enjoy a number of benefits including: the potential to increase earnings by 25% after completion of a one or two year MSW degree; scholarships and/or financial aid are awarded to over 90% of incoming MSW students; opportunities to resume-build and increase expertise in the area of your choice through internships at one of Rutgers 900 + agency partners. Dr. Herres will sign 9x forms.

February 18, 12:30-1:30pm, SSB 103: Life beyond TCNJ: Thinking about career choices. You are not the only one struggling to figure out career choices. Dr. Feiring will discuss ideas about how to think through and research potential career paths. Dr. Feiring will sign 9x forms.

February 18, 12:30-1:30pm, SSB 128: Recruiting visit from the Master’s program in Human Resource Management program at Rutgers University. Come learn about career opportunities from this program that accepts several TCNJ psychology courses, which can save a full semester plus tuition and graduate much sooner. Potential to double your beginning salary with the Rutgers Master in HR in the exploding field of Human Resources. Dr. Jason Dahling will sign 9x forms.

February 19, 11:00am-2:00pm, Rec Center: Spring Career and Internship Fair. Dress for Success and come visit with the many employers already registered. Seniors work to firm up that job opportunity or underclassmen score that summer internship. Students must bring 3 pieces of proof of attendance to SSB 109 to earn a 09x signature.

February 19, 2:00pm-2:50pm, Science Complex P101: 7 Steps to a Successful Semester. The Center for Student Success offers academic success workshops throughout the semester on various topics. Learn tips and skills to stay on top of your work! Maddie Anthes, CSS Interim Associate Director of Student Success (or a CSS staff person,) will sign 9x forms.

February 19, 2:00-3:00pm, Ed Building 109: Anti Violence Initiatives Presents: Green Dot Workshop. Green Dot emphasizes the idea that it is our individual choice to make our campus safer by recognizing high risk situations and the importance of bystanders. This workshop will focus on recognizing and intervening on stalking behaviors. To receive 9x credit: Sign the attendance list at the event, and then bring your form to the Anti-Violence Initiatives Office in Forcina Hall, Room 308 by Friday of the same week to get a signature.

February 20, 5:30-7:00pm, Library Auditorium: Anti Violence Initiatives Presents: Escalation Workshop. This workshop is a 90-minute, film-based experience that highlights the warning signs of an abusive relationship. After the film, facilitators will help attendees debrief and identify the abusive behaviors, with a focus on stalking shown on screen. To receive 9x credit: Sign the attendance list at the event, and then bring your form to the Anti-Violence Initiatives Office in Forcina Hall, Room 308 by Friday of the same week to get a signature.

February 21, 12:30-1:50pm, SSB 223: Progress or Principle? Partisan Competition, Bill Sponsorship, and Position-Taking in Congress. Presented by the TCNJ Department of Political Science and Dr. Jesse Crosson, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Trinity University.

February 21, 12:30-1:30pm, SSB 128: How Does Imagination Distort Memory for Actions? One psychology “fact” is that suggestions can lead to false memories for autobiographical events when the events are elaborated through repeated imagination. Dr. Leynes‘ lab conducted a neuroscience investigation where participants performed some actions in the lab (e.g., Color the Circle) and imagined performing other actions. In this presentation, he will share what they learned and what they think it means for understanding how false memories form. Dr. Leynes or Dr. Crawford will sign 9x forms.

February 25, 12:30-1:30pm, SSB 128: TCNJ’s Master of Public Health. Dr. Seals will discuss TCNJ’s 4 + 1 MPH program, an opportunity that provides students pursuing a BS/BA degree in a relevant discipline to take additional courses that apply toward MPH prerequisites. Dr. Barnack-Tavlaris will sign 9x forms.

February 25, 1:00-2:00pm, Forcina Hall Room 201: Anti Violence Initiatives Presents: Supporting Survivors Workshop. Learn about your rights as a student, resources on campus, and what you can do to support friends who have experienced stalking. To receive 9x credit: Sign the attendance list at the event, and then bring your form to the Anti-Violence Initiatives Office in Forcina Hall, Room 308 by Friday of the same week to get a signature.

February 26, 11am-12pm, SSB 130: Neuroscience Club meeting. The club meets to share information about relevant classes, programs, speakers, research, and other neuroscience opportunities. Any and all students are welcome to attend. During most meetings a moderator will lead a discussion of a journal article found on the website linked above; you will get more out of the discussion if you read the article and contribute to the discussion, but you should feel free to attend and listen.

February 26, 12pm-1pm, SSB 128: Psi Chi Presents: Student Internship Panel. Psi Chi is hosting a panel of students who have completed internships. Learn about how students learn about internships, land a spot at an internship, and how the internship has benefited the student. Students who attend will have ample opportunity to ask questions and learn more about the internship-for-credit process in TCNJ’s Psychology Department. All students (Psi Chi members or not) are welcomed and encouraged to attend. Psi Chi members will earn 1 Psi Chi point for attending.

February 26, 5:00pm-6:00pm, Ed Building 115: Black Madness :: Mad Blackness. In the Gloria Harper Dickinson Lecture, Dr. Therí Pickens, Professor of English at Bates College and author of “Black Madness :: Mad Blackness,” rethinks the relationship between Blackness and disability, unsettling the common theorization that they are mutually constitutive. Dr. Ada Onyewuenyi will sign 9x forms.

February 28, 12:30pm-1:50pm, SSB 223: Who’s Afraid of Party Polarization? Presented by the TCNJ Department of Political Science and Dr. Jeffrey Selinger, Associate Professor of Government, Bowdoin College.

MARCH

March 2, 4:00pm, Library Auditorium: Fencing in Democracy: Border Walls, Necrocitizenship, and the Security State. Border walls permeate our world, with more than thirty nation-states constructing them. Anthropologists Margaret E. Dorsey and Miguel Díaz-Barriga argue that border wall construction manifests transformations in citizenship practices that are aimed not only at keeping migrants out but also at enmeshing citizens into a wider politics of exclusion. For a decade, the authors studied the U.S.-Mexico border wall constructed by the Department of Homeland Security and observed the political protests and legal challenges that residents mounted in opposition to the wall. In Fencing in Democracy, Dorsey and Díaz-Barriga brilliantly expand conversations about citizenship, the operation of U.S. power, and the implications of border walls for the future of democracy.

March 3, 12:30-1:30pm, SSB 103: Dr. Feiring and her students will give an overview of research and findings from the Romantic Relationships Research Lab to better understand healthy and unhealthy collegiate relationships. Dr. Feiring will sign 9x forms.

March 6, 12:30pm, Library Auditorium: “Sisterhood of Struggle: Leadership and Strategy in the Campaign for the Nineteenth Amendment.” Dr. Lynda Dodd is a Fellow in Princeton’s Program in Law and Public Affairs and former Professor of Legal Studies and Political Science at The City University of New York-City College. Her teaching and research focuses on American political and constitutional development, constitutional law and theory, jurisprudence, and civil rights litigation. Her forthcoming book, ”Taming the Rights Revolution: The Supreme Court, Constitutional Torts, and the Elusive Quest for Accountability”, examines the political and legal debates regarding civil rights litigation under Section 1983, from its origins in the Civil Rights Act of 1871 to the Roberts Court era. Dr. Gray, Chair of the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department, will sign 9x forms.

March 10, 6:30pm, Library Auditorium: Annual WGSS Women’s History Month Alum Panel. Dr. Gray, Chair of the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department, will sign 9x forms.

March 11, 12:00-1:00pm, SSB Atrium: Spring Lab Fair. Learn how to get involved in various Psychology research labs from current lab members! To earn 09x credit, students must visit at least 4 labs and receive a sticker. After receiving 4 stickers, students can go to the main office, SSB 109, to have their 09x form signed. Psi Chi members will receive one point for attending.

March 11, 11am-12pm, SSB 130: Neuroscience Club meeting. The club meets to share information about relevant classes, programs, speakers, research, and other neuroscience opportunities. Any and all students are welcome to attend. During most meetings a moderator will lead a discussion of a journal article found on the website linked above; you will get more out of the discussion if you read the article and contribute to the discussion, but you should feel free to attend and listen.

March 24, 6:00pm, Library Auditorium: Haudenodaunee women and their influence on early feminism (suffrage movement). As a Condoled Bear Clan Matron of the Mohawk Nation Council of Chiefs, Wa’kerakats:te Louise McDonald Herne has worked for more than a decade to continue the historical and traditional strength of the Haudenosaunee through education and empowerment initiatives. One of her most influential societal contributions is her work to revive the Oheró:kon Rites of Passage ceremony, which helps youth make their transition into adulthood. She said renewing the ancient ritual was intended to combat social ills, such as drug abuse and suicide, and reconnect youth with their identity as Indigenous people. She is a founding member of the Konon:kwe Council, a grassroots organization that develops and advances policies to end domestic violence. Through this work, she has mentored and empowered young women to use their voice and stand in their rightful place of honor within their communities. Dr. Gray, Chair of the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department, will sign 9x forms.

March 25, 11am-12pm, SSB 130: Neuroscience Club meeting. The club meets to share information about relevant classes, programs, speakers, research, and other neuroscience opportunities. Any and all students are welcome to attend. During most meetings a moderator will lead a discussion of a journal article found on the website linked above; you will get more out of the discussion if you read the article and contribute to the discussion, but you should feel free to attend and listen.

March 25, 2:00pm-2:50pm, Science Complex P101: Review and Recharge to Finish the Semester Strong. The Center for Student Success offers academic success workshops throughout the semester on various topics. Learn tips and skills to stay on top of your work! Maddie Anthes, CSS Interim Associate Director of Student Success (or a CSS staff person,) will sign 9x forms.

APRIL

April 3, 12:30-1:30pm, SSB 128: The agency-beliefs-communion (ABC) model of stereotypes about societal groups. A plethora of research assumes that perceivers compare social targets primarily based on their agency/competence (A) and communion/warmth (C). Evidence for this is scarce, however, because in most studies perceivers could not respond to targets on dimensions other than A and C. We conducted data-driven research in which perceivers were free to compare freely chosen targets (in our case: societal groups) on any desired dimension(s). According to the resulting ABC model of stereotypes, perceivers compare U.S. groups based on their agency/socioeconomic success (A), conservative-progressive beliefs (B), and communion (C). A group’s communion (C) increases with similarity in A and B between this group and the perceiver (the reverse effect is smaller). Thus, the statistical relationship between groups’ perceived A and C is negative and positive for perceivers low and high in A, respectively (same logic for B and C). In further studies on the contextuality of A, B, and C stereotypes, we show that perceivers use the dimension(s) on which the groups present in a given situation vary the most. And in a more recent project, we show behavioral consequences. Members of thirty groups played an incentivized prisoner’s dilemma game with one member of each group. Players knew nothing of each other except group membership. Perceived group-self similarity in A and B increased groups’ perceived C and thereby behavioral cooperation across groups. Perceived similarity in B (vs. A) had a stronger effect, and this effect of similarity in B was stronger for perceivers with extreme (i.e., progressive or conservative) compared to moderate B. In addition to A and C, we conclude that a third primary stereotype dimension is B ranging from conservative to progressive. Alex Koch, University of Chicago Booth School, is an expert in stereotyping and person perception. Dr. Crawford will sign 9x forms.

April 8, 11am-12pm, SSB 130: Neuroscience Club meeting. The club meets to share information about relevant classes, programs, speakers, research, and other neuroscience opportunities. Any and all students are welcome to attend. During most meetings a moderator will lead a discussion of a journal article found on the website linked above; you will get more out of the discussion if you read the article and contribute to the discussion, but you should feel free to attend and listen.

April 14, 10:00am-2:00pm, Ed 212: AVI’s Day to End Rape Culture. Day to End Rape Culture (DERC) is a collaboration between students, clubs, and campus organizations to educate the campus community about rape culture through interactive presentations. This is an expo-style event where students will be able to create interactive presentations on one aspect of rape culture and facilitate rich discussion with their peers. To receive 9x credit: Go to 3 different tables and get Michelle Lambing‘s, Assistant Director for Anti-Violence Initiatives, signature. (Ms. Lambing will be at the event.)

April 15, 5pm, Mayo Concert Hall: Dawley Memorial Lecture: “Why Do People Vote Against Their Own Self-interests?: The 2020 Election and the Politics of Racial Resentment”. This year’s speaker is Jonathan Metzl, Professor of Sociology and Medicine, Health and Society at Vanderbilt University and author of the book “Dying of Whiteness: How the Politics of Racial Resentment is Killing America’s Heartland.”

April 22, 11am-12pm, SSB 130: Neuroscience Club meeting.  The club meets to share information about relevant classes, programs, speakers, research, and other neuroscience opportunities. Any and all students are welcome to attend. During most meetings a moderator will lead a discussion of a journal article found on the website linked above; you will get more out of the discussion if you read the article and contribute to the discussion, but you should feel free to attend and listen.

April 22, 2:00pm-2:50pm, Science Complex P101: Preparing for Finals. The Center for Student Success offers academic success workshops throughout the semester on various topics. Learn tips and skills to stay on top of your work! Maddie Anthes, CSS Interim Associate Director of Student Success (or a CSS staff person,) will sign 9x forms.

April 28, 12:30-1:30pm, SSB 128: Dr. Nuwan Jayawickreme, TCNJ Psychology Visiting Scholar and Associate Professor of Psychology, Program Director, Peace and Justice Studies at Manhattan College. Title and abstract forthcoming. Dr. Crawford will sign 9x forms.

MAY

May 6, 11am-12pm, SSB 324 (note room change): Neuroscience Club meeting. The club meets to share information about relevant classes, programs, speakers, research, and other neuroscience opportunities. Any and all students are welcome to attend. During most meetings a moderator will lead a discussion of a journal article found on the website linked above; you will get more out of the discussion if you read the article and contribute to the discussion, but you should feel free to attend and listen.

 

 

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